Family & Community: Housing Options

Planning your future housing needs is an important part of ensuring that you continue to thrive as you get older. This could mean modifying your home to make it safer and more comfortable, or it could mean moving to a housing facility with more support and social options available on site. It could even involve enrolling in a network of like-minded people to share specialized services - such as Neighborhood Falmouth - or moving to a retirement community, an assisted living facility, or perhaps a nursing home if you need skilled nursing services.

 

The following online resources outline the various types of housing options available:

Senior Housing - Your Guide to Assisted Living Facilities, Independent Living, and Other Housing Options: When deciding on the senior housing plan that’s right for you, it’s important to consider not only the needs you have now but also those you may have in the future. Information from HelpGuide.org

Guide to Senior Housing & Care: An online ebook that outlines the various housing alternatives for seniors. For each option the guide provides a description, services available and approximate monthly costs. Information from A Place for Mom 

AginginPlace.org: This onsite organization provides services to help keep senior adults in their homes as they age. This includes reviewing home care providers, medical alert systems, products and more, all with the intention of providing caregivers and family members the knowledge and support they need to make the most informed decisions about mobility, home modifications, caregiving, lifestyle, technology, and finance and legal issues.

Senior Residence Tour Checklist: Use this list of questions to help you evaluate a potential senior residence, such as a nursing home, or an active adult, independent living, assisted living, or continuing care retirement community. Information from the American Academy of Family Physicians.

How to Make a Home More User-Friendly for Deaf or Hard of Hearing People: When homeowners start to think about home improvements for a broader purpose, or when deaf individuals first undertake homeownership, they may find it difficult to know precisely where to start. Information from "Your At Home Team" located in Alexandria, VA.